HENRY DEEDES sees The Saj take aim at the ‘Cummings and goings’ 

Well, it was no knockout blow but it was certainly a decent jab to the sweetbreads. 

Sajid Javid’s resignation speech to the Commons yesterday may have lacked Sir Geoffrey Howe’s verbal pyrotechnics against Margaret Thatcher, but it will have rattled a few Downing Street teacups all the same.

Modest, witty, stylishly courteous, the ex-chancellor’s ten-minute sermon was more of an elegantly crafted bomblet, designed not to destroy or maim, merely to leave the Number 10 furniture caked in soot.

It was a speech almost entirely devoid of malice or self-pity which, in essence, marked its potency. The ex-chancellor appeared dignified. 

The Prime Minister, meanwhile, who is said to feel remorse about shafting friendly cove Saj, shifted and wriggled like a contorting ragworm.

Sajid Javid’s resignation speech to the Commons yesterday may have lacked Sir Geoffrey Howe’s verbal pyrotechnics against Margaret Thatcher, but it will have rattled a few Downing Street teacups all the same, writes Henry Deedes

The Saj entered the chamber for the first time since his defenestration just as Boris was called for PMQs, hoping to draw as little attention to himself as possible. Fat chance. 

As he made that long, unfamiliar walk to the backbenches all eyes fixed upon him. Stopping momentarily to say hello to Theresa May, he chose a sniper position several rows directly behind the PM, rather than Sir Geoffrey’s famous 45-degree vantage point.

When Speaker Hoyle called his name at 12.31pm the moment PMQs was done, the whole chamber, Prime Minister included, remained firmly in their seats.

Saj, flanked by his old University friend Rob Halfon (Harlow) and recently deposed transport minister Nus Ghani (Wealden), began by speaking warmly of the opportunities he’d had to ‘give back to the country that has given me so much’.

As talk turned to his resignation, Labour’s frontbench craned forward like a pack of llamas, thirsty for the juice.

Stopping momentarily to say hello to Theresa May, he chose a sniper position several rows directly behind the PM, writes Henry Deedes

Stopping momentarily to say hello to Theresa May, he chose a sniper position several rows directly behind the PM, writes Henry Deedes

Mr Javid admitted he had been unwilling to accept the PM’s demand, supposedly at the behest of his senior aide Dominic Cummings, that he sack his team of advisors. Such a move, he said, would not have been in the national interest.



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