Drones are flying underground in Japan to inspect parts of the Tokyo Metro

Drones are flying underground in Japan to inspect parts of the Tokyo Metro’s sprawling subway tunnels that are difficult for people to see

The remote-controlled 2.5 pound (1.15kg) drone is encased in a plastic sphere This 8.5-inch wide casing protects the machine from any potential damage Fitted with cameras it searches for signs of damage on inspections  Tokyo Metro hopes to soon use the drone throughout its 121 mile-long labyrinth below the Japanese capital city 

Maintenance workers in the bowels of the Tokyo Metro system are being assisted by emote-controlled 8.5-inch wide drones.

The remote-controlled 2.5 pound (1.15kg) drone is encased in a plastic sphere to protect it from any unfortunate bumps and knocks while navigating the labyrinth. 

Cameras on the custom-built drone will allow operators to scan hard to reach parts of the tunnel network for signs of damage. 

Current methods involve humans using a torch and looking up to see signs of damage and then having to use vehicles and platforms to reach them.  

Maintenance workers in the bowels of the Japanese metro system are being assisted by 8.5-inch wide drones. The remote-controlled 2.5 pound (1.15kg) drone is encased in a plastic sphere to protect it from any unfortunate bumps and knocks in the labyrinth

Tokyo Metro runs 85 per cent of the sprawling subway network of the nation’s capital city and is using the drones to inspect upper regions of the tunnels.

The drones are small and easy to control and their inspections do not require the time-consuming and expensive erection of platforms and scaffolding.

They can also get closer to the walls to search for signs of deterioration that a human being can, Japan News reports.   

Next Page