£2bn Stonehenge tunnel plan ‘scrapped’ after UNESCO survey

Two mile tunnel underneath Stonehenge is set to be scrapped over funding problems after survey uncovered issues that could send costs soaring to £2billion

Controversial plans to tunnel under Stonehenge are set to be scrapped The A303 upgrade in Wiltshire involves work around the World Heritage Site Planners wanted to dig a £2bn 1.8 mile tunnel under the neolithic monument The Cabinet is set to ditch the plan due to costs despite ongoing traffic mayhem

A controversial £1.7 billion scheme to build a tunnel underneath the neolithic Stonehenge is now set to be scrapped, it has been claimed today.

Survey work carried out on the UNESCO World Heritage Site last summer has allegedly uncovered a series of issues that would escalate the cost to over £2 billion – a cost the government are said to be not prepared to pay.

The news comes just a week after a petition with thousands of signatures calling on the government not to damage the site of the prehistoric stone circle with road plans was delivered to Downing Street.

A planned £2bn tunnel underneath Stonehenge, pictured, is under threat as the Government considers scrapping the controversial project which has been condemned by UNESCO 

The project was designed to slash travel times on the A303 in Wiltshire which is often at a standstill on bank holidays 

Author and historian Tom Holland, second left, took a petition of more than 50,000 signatures to Downing Street on February 19 calling for the plan to be scrapped

Author and historian Tom Holland, second left, took a petition of more than 50,000 signatures to Downing Street on February 19 calling for the plan to be scrapped 

The proposed upgrade of the A303 in Wiltshire, of which the planned 1.8 mile long tunnel would be a part of, is intended to bring relief to the route, during peak travel times.

However, according to the Salisbury Journal, the government is already looking at alternatives.

Experts have been in the area since last summer but the decision now rests with the Secretary of State for Transport Grant Shapps who has until the spring to announce his decision.

But some sources say that the decision could be made in time for the new budget on March 11.

Salisbury City MP John Glen, who has championed the tunnel scheme, said: ‘Large, strategic infrastructure projects like this are always subject to ongoing controversy and rumour until the final decision is made by government.

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