Shocking animation shows how the new coronavirus has outpaced SARS, MERS or Ebola

New video animation shows how the coronavirus outbreak has outpaced the SARS, MERS, Ebola and swine flu epidemics.

Made by production company Abacaba, and uploaded to YouTube on February 12, the clip compares how quickly each disease spread once cases were reported.

At first, the coronavirus outbreak spread slower than Ebola, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and swine flu. 

But, by Day 41 of their respective outbreaks, 243 were ill from Ebola, 182 were sickened by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), 520 had come down with swine flu, and 3,600 were infected with SARS.

In comparison, on Day 41 of the coronavirus outbreak – February 12 – more than 41,700 people were infected worldwide. 

A former chief medical officer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tells DailyMail.com that travel throughout China and being able to spread through the air are some ways of how the coronavirus outbreak was able to spread so quickly.

New video animations shows that, at first, the coronavirus outbreak did not spread as quickly as the outbreaks of Ebola, SARS, swine flu

But on Day 41, coronavirus had infected more than 41,700 people worldwide compared to Day 41 of the other outbreaks, which did not see as many people  infected

But on Day 41, coronavirus had infected more than 41,700 people worldwide compared to Day 41 of the other outbreaks, which did not see as many people  infected

The new virus falls under the family of coronaviruses, which can cause symptoms ranging from severe breathing problems to mild respiratory infections such as the common cold.

This means the strain, known as COVID-19, is the cousin of both SARS and MERS.

However, by the time SARS was contained in May 2004, 8,098 people had been sickened and 774 people had died – that’s a mortality rate of about 10 percent.

And, as of November 2019, there were 2,494 confirmed cases of MERS and 858 deaths, with a mortality rate of 34 percent.

So far, the new coronavirus virus appears to be less deadly but to spread just as fast, if not faster.    

Dr Robert Amler, former chief medical officer for the CDC and dean of New York Medical College, says that the fast-rising number of cases is likely due to China.

Of the more than 81,000 confirmed cases, more than 78,000 have been in the Asian country.

‘The biggest explosion has occurred in China and that’s likely a consequence of the enormous amount of travel in China,’ he said.

In fact, the virus broke out as China was experiencing the world’s largest human migration on the planet for the Lunar New Year.

Three billion trips within China were expected to be made between January 21 and March 1.



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