Facial recognition software company reveals it was security breach exposing its entire client list

Clearview AI, the facial recognition company that’s been used by more than 600 law enforcement agencies around the country, reveals security breach that exposed details of ALL its clients

Clearview AI sent a statement to customers alerting them to a security breachThe intruders accessed the company’s full client list and number of searchesThe company did not say how the breach happened but claims its servers weren’t accessed

Facial recognition software provider Clearview AI has revealed that its entire client list was stolen by someone who ‘gained unauthorized access’ to company documents and data.

According to a notice sent to its customers, Cleaview AI said that in addition to its client list, the intruder had gained access to the number of user accounts associated with each client, as well as the number of searches conducted through those accounts.

The company didn’t specify how the security breach had occurred nor who might have been responsible, and it claimed its servers and internal network hadn’t been compromised.

Facial recognition software company Clearview AI has revealed a security breach that exposed it’s client list and number of searches those clients made

‘Unfortunately, data breaches are part of life in the 21st century,’ Clearview attorney Tor Ekeland told The Daily Beast, who broke the story.

‘Our servers were never accessed. We patched the flaw, and continue to work to strengthen our security.’

Clearview AI software allows its customers to identify people by uploading photos to the company’s servers, where they’re compared against a database of more than 3 billion photos pulled from Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and even Venmo. 

The service was reportedly used by at least 600 different law enforcement agencies in the last year, including the Chicago Police Department, the Department of Homeland Security, and the FBI.

The company originally worked on smaller projects including a 2013 initiative with New Jersey Attorney General’s office to analyze driver’s license photos to identify people using the same photo for multiple identities.

The company has since expanded its business to include general law enforcement activity, among other projects.

The company claims its server's and internal networks were not breached but hasn't specified how exactly the data was accessed

The company claims its server’s and internal networks were not breached but hasn’t specified how exactly the data was accessed

The company has amassed a database of over 3 billion photos from sites like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and even Venmo, which its proprietary AI will scan to try and match people in photos uploaded by their clients

The company has amassed a database of over 3 billion photos from sites like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and even Venmo, which its proprietary AI will scan to try and match people in photos uploaded by their clients



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